December 21

Where Is The Backstop In The Withdrawal Agreement

The Irish government and the northern Irish nationalists (favourable to a united Ireland) supported the protocol, while the Unionists (who preferred the United Kingdom) opposed it. In early 2019, the Westminster Parliament voted three times against ratifying the withdrawal agreement, rejecting the backstop. The withdrawal agreement stipulates that the UK and the EU could get rid of the backstop requirements, but only if the UK and the EU agree that there is no need to avoid a hard border in Ireland. The EU and the UK have reached an agreement on the withdrawal agreement with a revised protocol on Ireland and Northern Ireland (abolition of the “backstop”) and a revised political declaration. On the same day, the European Council (Article 50) approved these texts. He says we need to find an alternative to backstop, and last week German Chancellor Angela Merkel gave him 30 days. Reality check: what do the Brexit backstop proposals mean? On 23 March 2018, EU and UK negotiators reached an agreement on the draft withdrawal agreement allowing the European Council (Article 50) to adopt guidelines for the framework for future eu-UK relations. In the following months, the British Parliament refused three times to ratify the agreement. In July 2019, Boris Johnson became Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and leader of the Conservative Party. On 28 August 2019,[39] the Johnson government refused to negotiate with Brussels unless the backstop was interrupted, which the EU did not say. [40] The Irish backstop was a protocol in the (un-ratified) Brexit withdrawal agreement that would have kept the United Kingdom (generally) in the customs union of the European Union and Northern Ireland (in particular) on certain aspects of the European internal market. until a solution is found to avoid a difficult environment.

This should not compromise the Good Friday agreement[47] and preserve the integrity of the European internal market. This would only have come into effect if there were no other solutions before the end of the (agreed) transition period. The “backstop” plan was agreed by negotiators between the UK and the EU and was part of Theresa May`s withdrawal deal in November 2018 (often referred to as the Brexit “divorce deal”). In October 2019, the UK and EU negotiators agreed on a revised protocol (see below) that resolved many of these problems by allowing Northern Ireland to leave de jure but effectively the border between the islands (Ireland and Britain). The “backstop” would have required northern Ireland to remain in certain aspects of the internal market until an alternative agreement between the EU and the UK is concluded. The proposal also provided that the UK as a whole would have a common customs territory with the EU until a solution was found to avoid the need for customs controls in the UK (between Northern Ireland and Great Britain).

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